Commit 3153d720 authored by Niels Möller's avatar Niels Möller
Browse files

* doc/lsh.texinfo: Spelling and grammar fixes by Johan

Myreen.

Rev: doc/lsh.texinfo:1.15
parent c2200087
......@@ -86,8 +86,8 @@ translation approved by the Free Software Foundation.
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@top
This document describes @command{lsh} and related programs. The @command{lsh} suit
of programs is intended as a free replacement for the @command{ssh} suit of
This document describes @command{lsh} and related programs. The @command{lsh} suite
of programs is intended as a free replacement for the @command{ssh} suite of
programs. In turn, @command{ssh} was intended as a secure replacement for
the @command{rsh} and @command{rlogin} programs for remote login over the
Internet.
......@@ -165,7 +165,7 @@ eavesdrop on the same criminals.
The enemy can be a criminal, or a competitor, or your boss who's trying
to find out how much you tell collegues at competing firms. It may be
yours or somebody elses national security officials. Or your
your own or somebody else's national security officials. Or your
ex-boyfriend who happens to be too curious.
So what can the enemy do to your communications and your privacy?
......@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ may be under enemy attack.
@table @dfn
@item Local attacks
The enemy controls your local environment. He or her may be looking over
The enemy controls your local environment. He or she may be looking over
your shoulder. Your local machine might be cracked. Or there may be some
device planted inside your keyboard transmitting everything you type to
the attacker. About the same problems occur if the attacker has taken
......@@ -331,7 +331,7 @@ man-in-the-middle attacks.
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection @code{ssh-1.x}
The first of the Secure shell programs was Tatu Ylonen's @command{ssh}.
The first of the Secure shell programs was Tatu Ylönen's @command{ssh}.
The latest of the version 1 series is @code{ssh-1.27} which speaks
version 1.5 of the protocol. The ``free'' version of @code{ssh-1.27}
does not allow commercial use without additional licensing, which makes
......@@ -344,7 +344,7 @@ back, for security reasons.
There also exists free implementations of @code{ssh-1}, for both Unix
and Windows. @command{ossh} and later OpenSSH are derived from earlier
version av Tatu Ylonen's @command{ssh}, and are free software.
version av Tatu Ylönen's @command{ssh}, and are free software.
Until @command{lsh} becomes stable and well tested, I would recommend using
some implementation of the @code{ssh-1} protocol.
......@@ -357,7 +357,7 @@ some implementation of the @code{ssh-1} protocol.
protocol, the development of which is supervised by the @acronym{IETF}
secsh Working Group. @command{lsh} implements the required subset of
this protocol. It is intended to be compatible with the @command{ssh2}
series of programs distributed by Datafellows.
series of programs distributed by F-Secure Corporation.
However, the existing versions of @command{ssh2} gets some details of the
protocol wrong (probably because it predates the protocol
......@@ -367,7 +367,7 @@ Interoperability between independently developed implementations is one
necessary condition for the @code{ssh-2} protocol to become a Proposed
Standard.
The license for Datafellow's @command{ssh2} programs is similar to that
The license for F-Secure's @command{ssh2} programs is similar to that
for recent versions of @command{ssh1}, but with a narrower definition of
``non-commercial use''.
......@@ -408,7 +408,7 @@ some other program in the ssh family is likely easier than to get the
operators to spend time and attention. So @command{lsh} should be easier to
use in an anarchistic grass-roots environment.
Another perspective is to combine ssh-features like @acronym{X} and
Another perspective is to combine ssh features like @acronym{X} and
@acronym{TCP/IP} forwarding with authentication based on Kerberos. Such
an arrangement may provide the best of two worlds for those who happen
to have an account at a suitable ticket-granting server.
......@@ -417,9 +417,9 @@ to have an account at a suitable ticket-granting server.
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection @acronym{IPSEC}
@acronym{IPSEC} is a set of protocols for protecting general ip-traffic.
It is developed by another @acronym{IETF} working group, and is also a
required part of @acronym{IP} version 6.
@acronym{IPSEC} is a set of protocols for protecting general
@acronym{IP} traffic. It is developed by another @acronym{IETF} working
group, and is also a required part of @acronym{IP} version 6.
Again, the main difference between @acronym{IPSEC} and Kerberos and ssh
is the set of machines that have to be secure and the keys that have to
......@@ -479,7 +479,7 @@ LD_LIBRARY_PATH to the right values instead.
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Getting started
This section tells you how to perform some common tasks using the
@command{lsh} suit of programs, without covering all options and
@command{lsh} suite of programs, without covering all options and
possibilities.
@menu
......@@ -641,7 +641,7 @@ lsh -g -R 8080:localhost:80 sara.lysator.liu.se
@end example
@noindent
This ask the remote machine to listen on port 8080 (note that you are
This asks the remote machine to listen on port 8080 (note that you are
probably not authorized to listen on port 80). Whenever someone
connects, the connection is tunnelled to your local machine, and
directed to port 80 on the same machine. Note the use of @option{-g};
......@@ -835,7 +835,7 @@ base64.
@item
The advanced syntax, which is intended for humans to read and write, and
bears some resemblance to List expressions.
bears some resemblance to Lisp expressions.
@end itemize
To see what your @file{~/.lsh/known_hosts} file really contains, try
......@@ -951,7 +951,7 @@ prefers not to use it.
@tab @code{3dec-cbc}, @code{blowfish-cbc}, @code{cast128-cbc},
@code{twofish-cbc}, @code{arcfour}
@tab The default encryption algorithm is tripple-DES in CBC mode. This
@tab The default encryption algorithm is triple-DES in CBC mode. This
seems to be the algorithm of choice among conservative cryptographers.
@item @option{-m} @tab Message Authentication
......@@ -966,7 +966,7 @@ algorithm list to @code{zlib}, @code{none}, which means that you want to
use @code{zlib} if the other end supports it. This is different from
@option{-zzlib} which causes the negotiation to fail if the other end
doesn't support @code{zlib}. A somewhat unobvious consequence of
@option{-z} having an @em{optional} argument is that if you provide an
@option{-z} having an @emph{optional} argument is that if you provide an
argument, it must follow directly after the option letter, no spaces
allowed.
......@@ -1191,7 +1191,7 @@ when the systems boots, and runs with root privileges. However, it is
also possible to start @command{lshd} manually, and with user
privileges.
There is currently no configuration files. Instead, command line options
There are currently no configuration files. Instead, command line options
are used to tell @command{lshd} what to do. Many options have @option{--foo}
and @option{--no-foo} variants. Options specifying the default behaviour
are not listed here.
......@@ -1225,7 +1225,7 @@ implement version 1 of the Secure Shell Protocol. But it can fork an
@command{ssh1} server when an old client connects. Falling back to
@command{ssh1} is inefficient, and requires some special features of the
server fallen back to. It should work with the @command{sshd} daemon
supplied with reasonably new versions of Datafellow's @command{sshd1},
supplied with reasonably new versions of F-Secure's @command{sshd1},
and with OpenSSH.
The optional argument provides the filename of the ssh1 daemon to use.
......
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